A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Katherine Trebeck, a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and also WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub.

This webinar reflects on the idea of a wellbeing economy: one that puts people and planet first. It will explore how this concept has risen in prominence in recent years and what it means in practice. It lays out some of the next steps that are needed to build a wellbeing economy and what different sectors need to do to play their part.

Event Speakers

Photo of Katherine Trebeck

Katherine Trebeck

Katherine is a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub. She is writer-in-residence at the University of Edinburgh’s Edinburgh Futures Institute and has roles advising the Club of Rome and Australia's Centre for Policy Development and The Next Economy.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Carl Rhodes, Dean and Professor of Organization Studies at the University of Technology Sydney Business School.

Economic inequality is a growing scourge on today’s world. At the apex of this massively unfair system are the global billionaires – an ultra-elite social class who have sequestered the world’s wealth while others languish in poverty and hunger. The immense social and political power billionaires possess cannot be explained by their wealth alone. Coupled with the financial resources billionaires command is a set of inter-connected myths that portray them as a ‘force for good’. This webinar reviews the myths of the good billionaire and how they serve to vanquish the democratic promise of shared prosperity and human flourishing. The webinar also discusses how undermining the myth can lead to a new moral and political vision for a future where the wealth created by human activity is shared by the many rather than hoarded by the few.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Robyn Ekersley, Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor in Political Science at the University of Melbourne and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.

The most influential accounts of the relationship between international order and justice in International Relations insist that establishing international order (especially among great powers) is necessarily prior to international justice.  However, these accounts were not fashioned with the challenge of global heating in mind, and they tend to ignore the many ways in which international orders constitute and maintain climate injustices. 

This presentation offered an ecologically enlarged account of world order that exposes the deepening contradictions between international ordering practices and their unjust disordering effects, which will undermine international order and produce increasingly dysfunctional states over time. It will be shown that addressing the climate (in)justice claims of the most vulnerable allows the demands of prudence and justice to converge to protect both societies and the climate system, but this will demand a new international economic order and not just a fairer and more effective climate regime.

Event Speakers

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Robyn Ekersley

Robyn has published widely in the fields of environmental political theory and International Relations, with a particular focus on democracy, the greening of states, and the governance of climate change.  She received a Distinguished Scholar Award (Environmental Studies) at the International Studies Assoc. Annual Convention, Toronto 2019.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.