A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Katherine Trebeck, a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and also WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub.

This webinar reflects on the idea of a wellbeing economy: one that puts people and planet first. It will explore how this concept has risen in prominence in recent years and what it means in practice. It lays out some of the next steps that are needed to build a wellbeing economy and what different sectors need to do to play their part.

Event Speakers

Photo of Katherine Trebeck

Katherine Trebeck

Katherine is a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub. She is writer-in-residence at the University of Edinburgh’s Edinburgh Futures Institute and has roles advising the Club of Rome and Australia's Centre for Policy Development and The Next Economy.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Robyn Ekersley, Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor in Political Science at the University of Melbourne and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.

The most influential accounts of the relationship between international order and justice in International Relations insist that establishing international order (especially among great powers) is necessarily prior to international justice.  However, these accounts were not fashioned with the challenge of global heating in mind, and they tend to ignore the many ways in which international orders constitute and maintain climate injustices. 

This presentation offered an ecologically enlarged account of world order that exposes the deepening contradictions between international ordering practices and their unjust disordering effects, which will undermine international order and produce increasingly dysfunctional states over time. It will be shown that addressing the climate (in)justice claims of the most vulnerable allows the demands of prudence and justice to converge to protect both societies and the climate system, but this will demand a new international economic order and not just a fairer and more effective climate regime.

Event Speakers

Photo of Robyn smiling

Robyn Ekersley

Robyn has published widely in the fields of environmental political theory and International Relations, with a particular focus on democracy, the greening of states, and the governance of climate change.  She received a Distinguished Scholar Award (Environmental Studies) at the International Studies Assoc. Annual Convention, Toronto 2019.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

In this episode, Sharon Friel, Megan Arthur and Nick Frank, will discuss the problem of the global consumptogenic system that generates intersecting climate change, social inequity, and health inequity crises, while drawing on emerging work from the ARC Laureate Fellowship Planetary Health Equity Hothouse.

In beginning to unpack the consumptogenic system that incentivises the excessive production and consumption of fossil fuel-reliant goods and services they will discuss ways in which the structure of global capitalism and different capitalist growth models undermine planetary health equity. They will also present a framework for pursuing governance for planetary health equity - and new lines of research that flow from this.

Event Speakers

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is a qualitative researcher interested in the governance of health and social policy, with a particular focus on non-state actor engagement and intersectoral policymaking.

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Hothouse Associate Fellow Christian Downie in discussion with Nick Frank and Sharon Friel:

The political activities of industries associated with the production and consumption of fossil fuels have thwarted state efforts to advance climate policy around the world. Yet we know very little about the role of trade associations that firms use to coordinate their activities. In this talk, Christian Downie from the Australian National University, follows the money to explore the political activities of trade associations in the United States between 2008 and 2018. Drawing on an original dataset built from tax filings, Christian will examine the revenue of these industry groups and their political spending. He will also draw on interviews with industry executives and lobbyists to discuss the political strategies trade associations use to shape climate policy.

Full recording available here on YouTube.

Event Speakers

Christian Downie, RegNet

Christian Downie is an Associate Professor in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Susan Park, Professor of Global Governance in Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Do international grievance mechanisms work? These non-legal, non-binding mechanisms are increasingly used to provide recourse for people suffering environmental and social harm from internationally funded development projects. But, to date, there have been no studies to show how these mechanisms make a difference to people using them.

Susan's research examines whether international grievance mechanisms provide redress for the environmental and social impacts of international development projects, with implications for planetary health. The World Bank lends approximately $20 billion annually to developing states to fund energy, telecommunications, and infrastructure projects to address poverty and improve peoples’ lives. Yet development projects may have dramatic and irreversible environmental and social impacts: loss of lives, livelihoods, and land, a breakdown in community cohesion, species extinction, habitat loss, and irreparable damage to local ecosystems. Despite the World Bank’s Inspection Panel operating for 30 years, we still do not know how it – or any other international grievance mechanism – contributes to improving development conditions. Many people harmed by international development projects choose these non-legal international procedures to have their voices heard often because legal and political options may not be available to them. Indeed, around the world people put themselves in grave harm from state and corporate reprisal for speaking out to protect their environment.

Identifying the use of international grievance mechanisms for addressing injustice is imperative given the rise of conflicts from development projects globally and the increasing number of environmental ‘defenders’ being killed to protect themselves and their environment. International development practices are also contributing to the crossing of known ecological system boundaries globally, such as climate change, habitat loss, and species extinction, the outcome of which is likely to “surpass known experience and which alter …almost all human and natural systems” (UNDRR 2019: 32).

Susan presented uses of an eco-justice frame to analyse grievances against international development projects financed by Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) to investigate whether they lead to improvements for people and ecosystems. An eco-justice approach combines the right of nature (to exist, repair, and regenerate) with environmental procedural rights for humans (to have access to information, to participate, and to have access to justice in environmental matters). Using an eco-justice frame for addressing grievances against development arguably can bring us closer to recognising both human and planetary health.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.