Thank you for joining us for the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse’s inaugural annual Policy Symposium, titled ‘Extinction thwarted? The nexus between climate change, social equity and health’.  

Humanity faces three major and interconnected challenges – climate change, social inequality and premature death and disease. Governance approaches to date have failed to address these problems, and in many cases have made the situation worse by approaching these issues and their common drivers in isolation from each other. For a governance response to be commensurate with the challenges faced by society, a more holistic approach is needed that brings disciplines and sectors together, and recognises the importance of addressing the common structural drivers of planetary health inequity. 

Hosted by Prof Sharon Friel, Director of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, with opening remarks from ANU Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian P. Schmidt AC, and the Honourable Ged Kearney MPattendees heard government, non-government and academic experts discuss the political, economic, and social dimensions of planetary health equity. Throughout the day we explored the role of different economic models, power in policy systems, and opportunities offered by optimising climate change mitigation policies for social and health goals.

The aim of the day was not to simply describe the problem but to identify the conditions that can enable the transformation of the system towards the promotion of the equitable enjoyment of good health for all within the context of a stable, sustainable ecosystem, and shift governance practices toward a more effective modern paradigm. The symposium comprises four consecutive sessions: Setting the Scene; Follow the Money; Advancing Progressive Policy, and Thwarting Extinction: Making it Happen.

Program

The full program, including speakers and agenda, is available here

 

Registrations for this event are now closed.

 

Getting to the venue

In the spirit of the event and Hothouse, we encourage you to use active and/or public transport. Car parking on ANU campus is quite limited. You can find further information about transport and parking on the university's website, and below. 

Walking Alinga to venue

Walking from Civic (Canberra CBD)

It is about 2kms from the Alinga St tram stop (Civic) to the venue. Allocate about 40-45 minutes for the walk and to settle into your seat before the starting time of 9:15am.

People riding bicycles
@CanberraByBike @parislord

Cycling

If you come by bicycle, there is plenty of bike parking at the entrance to the building (as well as a water bubbler).

Statue positioned as if riding a scooter

E-scooters

E-scooters are available through Beam Mobility and Neuron Mobility and are an efficient way to get from the uni’s surrounds to the venue. If you’re new to e-scooters and/or from outside of Canberra, make sure you’ve downloaded the apps first.

Toy car with Lego people as passengers

Driving

If you do need to drive, we encourage you to carpool. Visitors are able to park in Pay As You Go parking zones and Pay & Display zones after paying the appropriate fee to do so. There are a limited number of time limited parking bays at no charge. More information on PAYG.

Parking fees.

Map of visitors parking options.

The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse is the centrepiece of the Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship in Governance for Planetary Health Equity, housed in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

Read here to find out more about our work. 

 

We are delighted to announce the inaugural Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program. The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will welcome a small group of early career researchers and PhD students to join us in Canberra in September 2023.

The thematic focus of the 2023 Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program is “structural drivers of planetary health inequity”. Through an intensive fortnight of structured workshops and masterclasses related to theory, transdisciplinary research, and knowledge mobilisation, plus time for writing and conversations with the Hothouse team members and wider ANU community, the program offers an opportunity to develop new research skills, spark new collaborative ideas, and create new opportunities for knowledge mobilisation that aims to improve planetary health equity. The Future Leaders program will also involve interaction with the Hothouse 2023 Distinguished Visitor Thinker in Residence and participation in the Hothouse’s Annual Governance for Planetary Health Equity Policy Symposium, where the Hothouse research will be presented alongside insights from policy makers, NGOs, and business groups, including members of the Hothouse Advisory Board.

The program is open to early career researchers and PhD students at institutions across Australia and globally. The selected candidates will join the Hothouse between 4th-15th September 2023. Participants are welcome to remain at the Hothouse to think, write, and discuss for up to 13th of October.

Stay tuned to hear about the program, and the 2023 participants.

We are very excited to announce the second Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program. The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will welcome a small group of early career researchers and PhD students to join us in Canberra in September 2024.

The thematic focus of the 2024 Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program is “Addressing the structural drivers of planetary health inequity”. Through an intensive fortnight of structured workshops and masterclasses related to theory, transdisciplinary research, and knowledge mobilisation, plus time for writing and conversations with the Hothouse team members and wider ANU community, the program offers an opportunity to develop new research skills, spark new collaborative ideas, and create new opportunities for knowledge mobilisation that aims to improve planetary health equity. 

The program is open to early career researchers and PhD students at institutions across Australia and globally. The selected candidates will join the Hothouse between 2nd-13th September 2024. Participants are welcome to remain at the Hothouse to think, write, and discuss until 27th of September.

The Future Leaders Program explained

In this video, Sharon Friel, Director of the Hothouse, research fellows and 2023 program participants give an overview of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse Future Leaders Program.

Testimonials from 2023 Future Leader Fellows

In this video, some of the participants in the 2023 Future Leaders Program reflect on their experiences of the program.  

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Katherine Trebeck, a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and also WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub.

This webinar reflects on the idea of a wellbeing economy: one that puts people and planet first. It will explore how this concept has risen in prominence in recent years and what it means in practice. It lays out some of the next steps that are needed to build a wellbeing economy and what different sectors need to do to play their part.

Event Speakers

Photo of Katherine Trebeck

Katherine Trebeck

Katherine is a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub. She is writer-in-residence at the University of Edinburgh’s Edinburgh Futures Institute and has roles advising the Club of Rome and Australia's Centre for Policy Development and The Next Economy.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Carl Rhodes, Dean and Professor of Organization Studies at the University of Technology Sydney Business School.

Economic inequality is a growing scourge on today’s world. At the apex of this massively unfair system are the global billionaires – an ultra-elite social class who have sequestered the world’s wealth while others languish in poverty and hunger. The immense social and political power billionaires possess cannot be explained by their wealth alone. Coupled with the financial resources billionaires command is a set of inter-connected myths that portray them as a ‘force for good’. This webinar reviews the myths of the good billionaire and how they serve to vanquish the democratic promise of shared prosperity and human flourishing. The webinar also discusses how undermining the myth can lead to a new moral and political vision for a future where the wealth created by human activity is shared by the many rather than hoarded by the few.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

Transforming our economies to serve people and the planet is the big challenge of our time. However, there is no alternative, we need to move away from the current unhealthy and unjust economic practices that are harming the Earth’s ecosystems, which include all of us. Taking the lead to drive this necessary change is something that many are doing all around the world. 

On November 8, join the 2023 Fellows of the Future Leaders Program of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in an open conversation with external guests to talk about why this economic transformation is so pivotal to achieve Planetary Health Equity and where they see their contribution.  

No matter their area of expertise, from food and urban development to gender and climate, they are all working with the same vision in mind: a healthy planet where all people today and tomorrow can live and thrive. Are you working on a similar path or simply curious to learn more? Would you like to share your point of view and experience or simply just listen? Then join us!

This is an event part of Earth4All Action Week 2023.

Event Speakers

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad is a Research Fellow within the ANU’s School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to joining ANU, Amy worked on an Australian Research Council-funded project exploring the role of Australian local governments and civil society organisations in food system governance. She is particularly passionate about food systems, which also leads her advocacy work outside ANU.

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh is a political economist specialising in comparative capitalism, financialisation, corporate short-termism, and institutional theory. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in public policy based in Nepal and was previously a Lecturer in Political Science and International Relations at the University of Queensland.

Sandra Samantela

Sandra Samantela

Sandra is an environmental planner and assistant professor in the Department of Community and Environmental Resource Planning, University of the Philippines Los Baños where she teaches courses in human settlements/environmental planning and human ecology. Her research interests include climate and disaster vulnerability, urban land governance, and local development planning.

 

Steven Lade

Steven Lade

Dr Steven Lade is an ARC Future Fellow at the Fenner School of Environment & Society. He takes a systems approach to sustainability, working with the resilience and planetary boundary concepts across a variety of cases.

Betty Barkha

Betty Barkha

Dr Betty Barkha brings over a decade of experience in research, advocacy and business development across the Pacific and Asia. Betty's PhD focused on examining the Gendered impacts of Climate Change-Induced Displacement and Planned Relocation in Fiji, which has since informed the development of Pacific Regional Framework on Climate Mobility.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

In the first webinar of the series in 2024, Dr Nick Frank, Dr Megan Arthur and Prof Sharon Friel from the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will discuss the big policy and business challenges for planetary health equity. Specifically they will explore issues related to the political economy, financialisation, and governance coherence.

Please join us for episode 9 by registering at the link above.

Event Speakers

Nicholas Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Episode 10 features Jess Beagley, the Policy Lead at The Global Health and Climate Alliance, with Dr Megan Arthur and Prof. Sharon Friel.

COP28 in Dubai saw a record number of fossil fuel lobbyists at the heart of the international climate negotiations, while communities whose health and lives are most affected by planetary crises were severely under-represented. These imbalances in power were traceable in the decisions which emerged, which fell short of the commitments needed to protect the health of people and planet.

Meanwhile, health considerations, including those relating to air quality, are also often not deeply integrated into climate plans at country level. However, we can hope to see ambitious climate policy making to protect wellbeing through: improved representation of vulnerable communities and their priorities in policy fora, collaboration and strengthened messaging by civil society, cooperation across national Ministries responsible for planetary health issues, and regulation of industry participation.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Jess, smiling.

Jess Beagley

Jess leads GCHA’s policy work, including raising the profile of health in UNFCCC negotiations, assessing Nationally Determined Contributions as key components of a healthy and sustainable recovery, working with national partners on local policy processes, and research and analysis. She has a background in public health and environmental determinants.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

In this episode, Sharon Friel, Megan Arthur and Nick Frank, will discuss the problem of the global consumptogenic system that generates intersecting climate change, social inequity, and health inequity crises, while drawing on emerging work from the ARC Laureate Fellowship Planetary Health Equity Hothouse.

In beginning to unpack the consumptogenic system that incentivises the excessive production and consumption of fossil fuel-reliant goods and services they will discuss ways in which the structure of global capitalism and different capitalist growth models undermine planetary health equity. They will also present a framework for pursuing governance for planetary health equity - and new lines of research that flow from this.

Event Speakers

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is a qualitative researcher interested in the governance of health and social policy, with a particular focus on non-state actor engagement and intersectoral policymaking.

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

 


This episode has been postponed and will be rescheduled soon, please subscribe to our newsletter to be notified of the new date.


 

Episode 12 features Naomi Hogan, the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, discussing how to influence fossil fuel companies. Naomi has experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Over the past 15 years, Naomi has worked with investors, companies, regional communities, Traditional Owners, scientists and policy makers towards enhanced climate disclosures and environmental protections.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Naomi Hogan

Naomi Hogan

Naomi is the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, bringing experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Naomi trained in science communication, climate science and natural resource management at the Australian National University. 

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Episode 11 features Matt Castle, a Senior Lecturer in the Political Science and International Relations Program at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand whose current project explores how negotiators attempt to promote new norms in the trade regime, in the face of institutional and political constraints on innovation.

New global challenges demand new ideas. This is as true in the trade regime as in other areas of international cooperation. Yet by design and happenstance, existing rules and institutions are often resistant to change. Negotiators design global trade rules to provide a stable and predictable institutional environment, and these rules become ‘sticky’ over time. But faced with global challenges like climate change, new rules must emerge. How then do trade negotiators successfully promote new norms in a context that resists such innovation? I first examine the ways in which the trade regime has evolved into a ‘dense’ system of inter-related texts and discuss how this structure constrains the emergence of new ideas. I then look to opportunities for innovation and change. I focus on under-explored areas of the trade regime: agreement renegotiations, ‘side letters’, and ‘marginal’ agreements signed by small players.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Matt Castle

Matthew Castle

Matthew Castle is a Senior Lecturer in the Political Science and International Relations Programme at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. His research and teaching examine issues in international and comparative political economy, with a particular interest in the politics of trade and trade agreements.

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Beck Pearse, a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society.

Beck will discuss the social realities of Australia’s energy workforce and the resultant difficult questions about the political economy and geography of ‘just transition’ advocacy. Answers to questions about the where and who of transition management will be negotiated at multiple scales. The presentation will conclude with provisional thoughts on the institutions and reform strategies that will shape the future conditions, and therefore health, of energy labour.

Beck Pearse is a Lecturer jointly appointed to the ANU School of Sociology and Fenner School of Environment and Society. Beck’s current research projects investigate labour and land relations in the transition to a 'net zero' economy. She's interested in how people work and negotiate industrial change. Beck's doctoral thesis on the political economy of Australia’s emissions trading scheme was published as a monograph Pricing Carbon in Australia (Routledge/Earthscan, 2018). More recently, she co-authored Renewables and Rural Australia (2022) - the first social study of rural people's perspectives on the NSW Renewable Energy Zones.

Event Speakers

Photo of Rebecca Pearse

Beck Pearse

Beck Pearse is a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society. Her teaching and research focuses on inequalities and environmental policy. Beck is interested in how people from different walks of life experience environmental change and how environmental policy can contribute to building a fair and ecologically abundant world.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Hothouse Associate Fellow Christian Downie in discussion with Nick Frank and Sharon Friel:

The political activities of industries associated with the production and consumption of fossil fuels have thwarted state efforts to advance climate policy around the world. Yet we know very little about the role of trade associations that firms use to coordinate their activities. In this talk, Christian Downie from the Australian National University, follows the money to explore the political activities of trade associations in the United States between 2008 and 2018. Drawing on an original dataset built from tax filings, Christian will examine the revenue of these industry groups and their political spending. He will also draw on interviews with industry executives and lobbyists to discuss the political strategies trade associations use to shape climate policy.

Full recording available here on YouTube.

Event Speakers

Christian Downie is an Associate Professor in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Climate change is not just an environmental threat but poses major and growing risks to the health of today’s population and future generations. It is already adversely affecting human health and health systems, and projected climate change will also increasingly undermine the functioning of health care systems and broader public health efforts. While adaptation is essential, there will be limits to our ability to adapt, and cutting emissions rapidly to protect health is vital. Progress towards zero emissions will bring not only long term benefits for health by reducing the risks from climate change but will also improve health in the near term, for instance through reduced exposure to air pollution by replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy; healthy and more sustainable food and transport systems. This presentation will summarise the evidence for the health (co-) benefits of climate action and suggest how progress towards net zero emissions could be accelerated.

Episode 13 will feature Prof Sir Andy Haines: Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, co-director of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Climate Change, Health and Sustainable Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. 

Andy was formerly Professor of Primary Health Care at UCL and Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine from 2001- October 2010. He was a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for the 2nd , 3rd  and 5th assessment exercises. He chaired the Rockefeller /Lancet Commission on Planetary Health and the InterAcademy Partnership working group on climate change and health. He currently co-chairs the Lancet Pathfinder Commission on Pathways to a Healthy Net Zero Future. He was knighted for services to medicine in 2005. He was awarded the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement in 2022 and a DSc honoris causa by ANU in 2024.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Andy Haines by a window

Andy Haines

Sir Andy Haines is Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, co-director of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Climate Change Health and Sustainable Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Understanding power, politics, policies, people and processes to improve governance for planetary health equity outcomes.

Join ARC Laureate Fellow Prof Sharon Friel and Laureate Research Fellows Drs Megan Arthur and Nick Frank as they showcase some of their Planetary Health Equity Hothouse research. Planetary health equity (PHE) is defined here as the equitable enjoyment of good health in a stable Earth system.

PHE is in crisis. Despite evidence of these massive challenges and multiple calls to action, why has there been so little effective remedial action? And more importantly, how can we overcome this failure?

To answer these questions, the Hothouse team will discuss new research for understanding power, politics, policies, people and processes that enable coherent governance to improve PHE outcomes.

About the speakers

Sharon Friel is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity in the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). She is Director of the PHE Hothouse and Australian Research Centre for Health Equity (ARCHE) at the ANU.

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the PHE Hothouse at RegNet. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance. Nicholas employs formal theory, econometrics, inferential network approaches, and text-as-data techniques in his research.

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the PHE Hothouse at RegNet. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health, studying the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is in-person only. Registration is not required for in-person attendance as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Planetary Health Equity Hothouse logo from hothouse.anu.edu.au

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Susan Park, Professor of Global Governance in Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Do international grievance mechanisms work? These non-legal, non-binding mechanisms are increasingly used to provide recourse for people suffering environmental and social harm from internationally funded development projects. But, to date, there have been no studies to show how these mechanisms make a difference to people using them.

Susan's research examines whether international grievance mechanisms provide redress for the environmental and social impacts of international development projects, with implications for planetary health. The World Bank lends approximately $20 billion annually to developing states to fund energy, telecommunications, and infrastructure projects to address poverty and improve peoples’ lives. Yet development projects may have dramatic and irreversible environmental and social impacts: loss of lives, livelihoods, and land, a breakdown in community cohesion, species extinction, habitat loss, and irreparable damage to local ecosystems. Despite the World Bank’s Inspection Panel operating for 30 years, we still do not know how it – or any other international grievance mechanism – contributes to improving development conditions. Many people harmed by international development projects choose these non-legal international procedures to have their voices heard often because legal and political options may not be available to them. Indeed, around the world people put themselves in grave harm from state and corporate reprisal for speaking out to protect their environment.

Identifying the use of international grievance mechanisms for addressing injustice is imperative given the rise of conflicts from development projects globally and the increasing number of environmental ‘defenders’ being killed to protect themselves and their environment. International development practices are also contributing to the crossing of known ecological system boundaries globally, such as climate change, habitat loss, and species extinction, the outcome of which is likely to “surpass known experience and which alter …almost all human and natural systems” (UNDRR 2019: 32).

Susan presented uses of an eco-justice frame to analyse grievances against international development projects financed by Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) to investigate whether they lead to improvements for people and ecosystems. An eco-justice approach combines the right of nature (to exist, repair, and regenerate) with environmental procedural rights for humans (to have access to information, to participate, and to have access to justice in environmental matters). Using an eco-justice frame for addressing grievances against development arguably can bring us closer to recognising both human and planetary health.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.